Join us on June 12th at 10:00 am as we discuss with top panelists important misconceptions concerning black fathers.

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Correct the myth… Black Fatherhood is not dead. Let us honor good fathers and celebrate them for what they contribute to the children, families and their communities. Educate on the importance of engaged dads in general (all races).

Fathers’ Day? Every Day — The Importance And Influence Of The Black Father

Beyond being often classified as mere sperm donors, the role of fathers in the lives of children — especially black males — have never been more important, or necessary, than it is right now. One mommy, two mommies, or 27 mommies is no substitute for one daddy.  Black men bring power into a family, and the knowledge, the energy, the development when they are there, makes the whole world an unlimited universe. However, when they are absent, it takes away from the power of the Black family.

The power of having a Black father, or a Black man, in the home is tremendous, because it gives symbolism. The Black father should be a role model for his children, and all children in his community. If he is in the home, then that’s leadership. That is the role of a man — providing, nurturing, caring and teaching.

In the absence of that, it falls to a woman. A woman cannot understand how to be a man. It is both mentally and biologically impossible. And when that man is absent, then it falls to the uncles, the church, to the community and to the village. – Yvonne Sam, http://pridenews.ca/2018/06/11/fathers-day-every-day-power-black-father/

Black Fathers Matter

What happens… when there are impediments to both the presence and participation of fathers in the lives of children, particularly Black fathers?  Conservatives often address this question by contending that Black fathers are not adequately present and involved with their families. They push to create policies that encourage marriage among families, particularly Black families, as a way to foster child well-being and success.

The share of Black children born to single mothers has more than tripled from about 24% in 1960 to nearly 70% in 2018, indicating that Black fathers are less likely to live in households with their children than fathers of other races. But it’s important to note the share of children in single-mother families among all races has risen dramatically since the 1960s.

Moreover, we now know that among nonresidential fathers, Black fathers are more involved than Hispanic dads and share more responsibilities and generally co-parent better than white or Hispanic nonresidential fathers. Still, nonresidential Black fathers face myriad barriers to being a stable, consistent support to their children because of other systemic challenges that conservatives often overlook. – Black Dads Matter by Kenneth Braswell, https://ifstudies.org/blog/black-dads-matter

The Truth: Black fathers are more involved

We cannot equate the number of unmarried dads to the number of “fatherless” children. First of all, marriage rates don’t necessarily reflect the number of Black fathers living with their children; as writer Josh Levs points out, the majority of Black dads (2.5 million of around 4.2 million) do live with their kids, even if they’re not married to their partner.

And second of all, according to a 2013 report by the CDC, Black dads—whether they live with their children, or not—are more actively involved in their children’s lives than their counterparts of other races.

For example, the CDC reports that Black fathers who live with their children are more likely than fathers of other races to provide physical care (bathe, diaper, feed) for their young children, read to their children, and help their children with their homework—all on a daily basis—than fathers of other races who also cohabitate with their kids.

The report also reveals that, among dads who don’t live with their children, Black dads are more likely to be involved in care, including reading to their children, helping them with homework, talking to them about their days, and taking them to activities, than Hispanic or white dads who live apart from their kids. Non-residential Black fathers are also the least likely to report that they’re not at all involved in the care of their children, including bathing, dressing, changing diapers, and playing with their children. – Alecia Eberhardt-Smith,  August 11, 2020 https://www.givelegacy.com/resources/the-truth-about-black-fatherhood/

For example, the CDC reports that Black fathers who live with their children are more likely than fathers of other races to provide physical care (bathe, diaper, feed) for their young children, read to their children, and help their children with their homework—all on a daily basis—than fathers of other races who also cohabitate with their kids.

The report also reveals that, among dads who don’t live with their children, Black dads are more likely to be involved in care, including reading to their children, helping them with homework, talking to them about their days, and taking them to activities, than Hispanic or white dads who live apart from their kids. Non-residential Black fathers are also the least likely to report that they’re not at all involved in the care of their children, including bathing, dressing, changing diapers, and playing with their children. – Alecia Eberhardt-Smith,  August 11, 2020 https://www.givelegacy.com/resources/the-truth-about-black-fatherhood/