WHY IT IS IMPORTANT TO DISCUSS

According to an article in Parents.com, research shows that children start assigning meaning to skin color at 18
months and can distinguish different races by age 3. Make sure they are ready for the subject when it comes up at
school, or with their young friends.

START WITH AN AGE-APPROPRIATE QUESTION

Have you noticed that flowers and birds have variety?
What is different about them? What is the same?
What is your favorite flower color?
What is your favorite bird color?

BUILD ON THE SCRIPTURE

Read together Genesis 1:20-29
Did God make all of the flowers and birds?
So, do you think God enjoys the variety he has made?
Have you noticed the variety in people?

Read together John 3:16-17; 1 John 4:10-11; Acts 10:34-35
Does God love all people?

Read together Revelation 7:9-10
Will there be a variety of people in heaven?

How will you respond when someone says untrue things about people who are different?

Tips to Talking to Your Kids

It is best to prioritize conversations with your children on subjects they show interest in. This way they are more likely to retain what they learn. It is also a good way to know they are ready to discuss it.

They may not be old enough or mature enough for certain topics such as drugs and sex, for example. To discover their level of interest in a subject and the appropriateness of having the conversation at this time, ask them a question about it, and listen to their response.

Pick a topic that is in the news, or when it comes up in a TV show or movie, for example. Proceed only as far with the discussion as their interest indicates. Keeping the lines of communication open with your children throughout their lifetime will ensure that when their interest grows, they will feel comfortable asking you for more information. Reassure them they can come to you at any time with anything that is on their mind.

Disclaimer: The suggestions and methods put forward are the opinions of the individual authors, and are not necessarily shared or endorsed by Urban Light Ministries, Inc., its staff or individual members of the board of
trustees.

OTHER SUGGESTED RESOURCES

“”Anti-Racism for Kids: An Age-by-Age Guide to Fighting Hate,” Parents.com, by Katie
Arnold-Ratliff

“How to Talk to Kids about Race and Racism,”Parenttoolkit.com, Julie Lythcott-Haims, et. al.

“How to Talk About Race with Your Kids,” Christianitytoday.com, Michelle Reyes.